Why you need a good mentor to succeed, and how to get one

Do you feel as though you’re working tirelessly with little to no progress being made?

You want to succeed so badly, but it’s very difficult if you’re relying upon your own knowledge and your own network.

Luckily, there’s another person who wants to see you succeed, and who can help you grow and realize more of your potential much sooner than you dreamed.

That person is a mentor.

Mentorship is the reason I am where I am today. My mentor was the former CEO of American Airlines, and without his influence in my life I would likely not be doing what I am now in my career.

The great thing about having a mentor in your life is that it’s proven expertise– they’ve achieved what you want to do. A mentor can provide you with the money, connections and experience that you would otherwise have to gain through many years of failure and painful lessons.

Some good practices I have found in seeking after a mentor, if you’re interested:

  • Follow people who do what you want to do. If you don’t know what it is you want to do, you’ll never be able to boil the ocean to fry the fish. You’ve got to zero in on the people you want to be like.
  • Study their content. When you can show that you’ve done your homework and know how you want to contribute, you are much more likely to gain their respect.
  • Demonstrate gratitude. Coming from a place of gratitude and humility will increase your chances of eliciting a positive response.
  • Offer a small favor. This could be simply asking in what ways you could help them, and you may be surprised by the opportunities that present themselves.

I get hit up constantly by people seeking favors or advice, but the people who take the above approach are often the only I’ll take the time out of my day to respond to.

Now, understand this isn’t me suggesting you to immediately reach out to Richard Branson or Tony Robbins for mentorship, but what you will find is that there are many other people who you can seek after that can help you do the things you want to do– IF you’re specific and know exactly what it is you want to do.

Does this make sense to you?

Listen to this podcast I did on how mentorship can enhance your life, income, and impact to gain deeper insights into this subject and learn more in-depth strategies.

How borrowing a projector turned into a dream calling

6 years ago, JD Lasica, a high-power journalist who runs socialmedia.biz, reached out for an interview.
I was so busy running Facebook ads that I was pondering whether to do the interview or get an hour of much-needed sleep.

I’m so grateful I chose to forgo that hour of sleep.
And when you look back on your life journeys, you’ll find the small choices that made all the difference.

That interview to share expertise on how Facebook ads led to his invite to speak at the Social Media Club in Oakland.
We didn’t have a projector, so JD asked his buddy, Kenny Lauer, if we could borrow his projector.

In meeting Kenny, I had much respect for the guy who ran events such as DreamForce and Oracle OpenWorld.
And unforeseen to both of us, a few years after that, he ran digital and marketing for the Golden State Warriors.

And then he pulled me in to help him with social ads and analytics, even gave me the wonderful compliment of “Dennis has not only been amazing with us at the Warriors but someone I consider a great friend” – wow!
All based on that seemingly random encounter 6 years ago to ask someone if we could borrow a projector.

Kenny was then able to hire Daniel Brusilovsky, founder of Teens in Tech, and co-founder at Ribbon and Imoji.
That led to me being able to work more closely with Daniel, which brought me into his network.

And that’s how I met Christine Stoffel, founder of the SEAT consortium, the highest power network of sports executives and tech.


Then being able to share our experience with the Warriors— how we used social to drive provable ticket revenue.

A close friend of mine, Spencer Taggart, who I also met because of these experiences, has spoken of similar encounters. Spencer once told me…

“I randomly met a famous chef at a trade show and we quickly became dear friends. (Chef Art Smith) Because of this one relationship, we each have new friends, and business partners that have dramatically changed the course of our lives; more than once. I have no clue where my life would be if I hadn’t been willing to step out of my comfort zone and befriended this mountain of a man. Chef’s life has changed in phenomenal ways as well. Follow your gut, eliminate fear, and believe in the power of relationships.”

 

The chain of events, butterfly style, goes on.

Every decision you make creates your domino destiny, amplifying your future in ways unforeseen to you now.

So the moment you think you’re amazing, consider the folks who have made your journey possible.
I sit with awe and gratitude of the mentoring and friendship I’ve been so lucky to receive.

Yet had I not gone all in on Facebook ads— to literally spend thousands of hours making campaigns,  JD Lasica wouldn’t have reached out.
So it starts with you openly sharing something you’ve learned, investing time to get good at it, and building your personal brand.

Share what chain of events created something amazing for you.


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