The Hammer Is Hiring a Manager of Our Content Factory

Darryl Issacs, a Personal Injury Attorney at Issacs and Issacs– The Hammer, needs a business person to help him drive more cases to grow his law firm using Content Factory. 

Google “Dennis Yu Content Factory” or “Digital Marketer Content Factory” to understand these four stages.

Content Factory

Darryl’s producing a ton of content as a figurehead, but he has other partners and attorneys, and he needs to create content in Spanish.

The firm handles various cases nationwide, including truck, motorcycle, and car accidents.

One way to manage this content is by using a team of virtual assistants to capture the stories of clients who have experienced life-changing accidents and share them to help more people.

When producing content, it’s important to have a strategy and repurpose it for multiple channels, not just TikTok, YouTube, or Facebook. 

Then we will boost it using the dollar-a-day strategy– Which is the last stage in Content Factory.

The beauty of managing this content factory is that you can show that you’re managing and growing the firm, provably and analytically.

This position has the potential to be very well paid, especially if you can show that you can drive results and understand the different stages of the content factory.

When applying, it’s important to show that you understand the business side of things and can generate results, not just list your resume and years of experience. 

If you can prove you can drive results and understand the process, you might be eligible for bonus compensation.

Effects of Good Hire And Bad Hire On Your Business

Don’t worry about overpaying for talent. The cost of a bad hire is 20 times that.

Mistakes cost you money, reputation, and sanity.

A bad hire infects the rest of your team.

When they finally leave, you also lose the investment you made in them, plus you have to rescue projects they abandoned.

On the other hand, a great hire takes the burden off your shoulders instead of creating more problems for you to solve.

Good Hire Bad Hire

They anticipate what’s needed and spring into action without you needing to initiate it for them.

Their value keeps multiplying over time since they know your business well and build up teams, scaling the goodness.

When this happens, reward them handsomely and proportionately to their value.

The most successful entrepreneurs I know are not the smartest or hardest-working people. They build up great teams around them.

Same mistake as hiring someone you like, whom YOU believe in, but they haven’t demonstrated that they are committed.

They will give up easily, causing you to lose the investment you’ve made in them.

Avoiding loss is the key to hiring instead of trying to give everyone a chance.

See my blog post on the “5 most important traits to run a successful business” and Having Good People Is Key to Your Business!

Mistakes to Avoid When Applying for a Job

If you are reading this, you can get a job with us. 

We are hiring like crazy because we are fortunate to have many clients and partners.

I’m going to tell you about some mistakes people make when applying.

By avoiding the three common mistakes and following the instructions, you will be ahead of anyone applying for a particular position.

Mistake Number 1 – Zero Preparation

The first mistake is to reach out to other folks on the team or me with zero preparation.

Do not send a canned message that says, “Dear Sir,” and then it just has stuff that you didn’t put anytime into researching what our company does.

If you haven’t seen the tons of projects we have, then you’re going to look like the thousands of other people just blasting their resumes out.

Make sure you spend a little time, personalize your message, and say something particular about what you learned.

Show that you stand out, which puts you ahead of 95% of other candidates.

Mistake Number 2 – Grammatical Errors

Watch out for grammatical errors and other kinds of mistakes. If you have capitalization and punctuation errors, it hurts your chances.

We are looking at your ability to communicate.

Even if English is not your first language, that’s okay. We have a lot of folks in the Philippines, Brazil, Pakistan, and other places.

But you have to show that you can communicate very clearly. It doesn’t mean you have to be a writer or to be able to write a book. Avoid grammatical mistakes.

Mistake Number 3 – Ignoring Instructions

Not paying close attention to instructions.

The instructions for any particular job will be something like sending a note to a team member, making a one-minute video and posting it on LinkedIn, or sending something with a subject line or a keyword.

Pay attention to the details, as we constantly test your ability to follow directions.

This mocks out many candidates because they cannot pay attention to the details.

It would be best if you worked closely with other team members when working on a team in different groups. 

Mistakes to avoid

If you come to me every time, it shows you cannot work in a team. However, that doesn’t mean I do not want to hear from you.

Imagine if everyone went to the CEO of Costco across all the different stores of Costco. They would never get anything done because they would just be creating chaos.

You must learn to follow directions and know who to contact for whom.

It could be another team member. It could be someone who is in a particular group.

There are always some instructions, and you have to demonstrate that you can figure out who is the right person to contact or be able to solve the problem for yourself or go to the training.

Certainly, reach out when it is a question that does deserve clarification.

But remember, if you are implying that the team is evaluating your ability to follow directions, the question you ask tells us your comprehension and how well you understand.

Maybe you want to be a project manager, have 20 years of experience running an agency, and want to work with us. That’s great too.

Engage and Show your Expertise

I can tell you if it’s working for me; I will first see whether you engage with our content and whether you have the expertise.

I will look you up and determine the best use of your time and my time.

There is so much opportunity in our mission to create a million jobs, and I’m happy that we have friends like John Jonas and our friends with Fiverr, Nelson, who have a bunch of 7 figure agencies and helping other agencies scale.

Suppose you are an agency owner reading this for fun, great! We would love to see you hire people; the people coming to our program are not for us. It’s for all of us.

We want to create jobs together based on clear, fair instructions for anyone who can qualify and get these things done; doesn’t matter where on the planet, if you are a single mom or broke. If you can get the job done, we want to hire you, period.

So, I hope that is encouraging for you and that you can step ahead and be ahead of most people who make mistakes when applying for jobs, whether for us or somebody else.

Looking forward to seeing your progress, and if by some chance you don’t hear from us or you get declined, maybe you are not ready. 

You can always try again. We believe people can constantly improve and accelerate learning.

And we are a team that comes from making many mistakes we have seen in the last 20+ years of hiring.

Go check it out, and I can’t wait to see your progress along the way.

3 mistakes that get applicants rejected

Over the years, I’ve hired hundreds of freelancers, VAs, and team members.

And here are the three big mistakes that candidates continue to make.

Hey, Dennis Yu here. And you’re watching this video because we want to improve your chances of getting a job with us. We’re hiring like crazy because we’re so fortunate to have so many clients and partners, but I want to tell you about some of the mistakes people make when they apply. So the first mistake is that they reach out to other folks or me in the team with zero preparation.

So if you send a canned message that says, dear, sir, it just has stuff that shows you didn’t put any time into researching what our company does. You’re not following us on social media. You haven’t clearly seen the kinds of projects that we have. Then you’re going to look like the thousands of other people that are just blasting their resumes out.

So number one, make sure you put in a little bit of time and personalize your message to say something specific about what you’ve learned. It will show that you stand out, and that will put you in 95% of the other candidates. Number two is grammatical errors and other kinds of mistakes. So we’re looking at your ability to communicate.

If you have errors in there and capitalization and punctuation, that’s going to hurt your chances, even if English is not your first language. That’s totally okay. We have a lot of folks in the Philippines, Pakistan, Brazil, and other places, but you have to show that you can communicate very clearly.

It doesn’t mean you have to be a writer or you have to be able to write books or things like that, but just avoid things that are sloppy or have grammatical mistakes. Number three is the follow-up. So when you want to know how you’re doing, then you want to make sure you’re paying close attention to the instructions.

The instructions for any particular job are going to be something like sending a note to Juan or making a one-minute video and posting it on LinkedIn. Or send something with a subject line that has a squirrel in it. These are all ways where we are testing your ability to follow directions. So, that’s what knocks out most candidates because they can’t pay attention to detail.

And so when we’re working in a team where it’s not just you, but a team of us working together in different groups, it’s absolutely critical that you can work closely with these other team members. If you come to me every single day, that shows that you can’t work in a team, right? It doesn’t mean I don’t want to hear from you, but if you can imagine, like the guy Jim, who started Costco, if everyone went to the CEO of Costco across all the different stores of Costco like they would just never get anything done.
Cause it would just be chaos. You’ve got to learn to follow directions and know whom to contact for whom, so it could be other team members. They could be someone who’s in a particular group. There are always some instructions. And you want to demonstrate that you can. Figure out who is the right person to contact or be able to solve problems for yourself or go through the training.

Certainly, reach out when it’s a question that does deserve to where there’s clarification that you need. But remember that if you’re applying, the team evaluates your ability to follow directions. And then, the questions you ask, tell us your comprehension and how well you understand.

So if you can follow those three, yes, there’s a good likelihood that you will be way ahead of everyone else. Who’s applying for a particular position, or maybe you want to be a project manager? Maybe you already have 20 years of experience running an agency, and you want to work with us. That’s great too.
I can tell you if it’s working for me, the first thing I’m going to do is see whether you’ve engaged with our content and whether you have the expertise, as opposed to wanting to get me on the phone right away, where I have to explain what our company does. Because I’m going to look you up before we meet in the same way, you should look me up and figure out how to make the best use of your time and the best use of my time.

So I hope that helps you. Good luck. There’s so much opportunity. I would love to find some way to be able to create a million jobs, which is our mission. And so glad to have friends like John Jonas of online jobs, not pH, our friends at five. Josh Nelson who’s got a bunch of seven-figure agencies in his group.
So we’re helping agencies scale. If you’re an agency owner and you’re listening to this, watching this just for fun, by the way. Great. We would love to see you be able to hire more people. And the people that come through our program, it’s not just for us; it’s for all of us. So we want to create jobs together based on clear, fair instructions that anyone who can qualify, anyone who can get these things done, doesn’t matter where on the planet, doesn’t matter if there’s something.

It doesn’t matter if they’re broke; if you can get the job done, then we want to hire you. So I hope that is encouraging for you. And I hope that you can step ahead and be ahead of most of the people that make mistakes when they’re applying for a job, whether it’s with us or somebody else. So looking forward to seeing your progress, and if, for some chance, you don’t hear from us or you were declined because maybe you’re not ready.

We can always try again. We believe that people can always improve. The best thing is don’t make those mistakes in the first place. You want to accelerate your learning and invoice and avoid the pain that comes from making the kinds of mistakes that we’ve seen over the last 20-plus years in hiring. So go check it out, and I can’t wait to see your progress along the way.

My friend.

Here are our hiring process and deboarding process.

In 2020, you need systems and processes to get the work off of you. That means you need a simple, hassle-free way to hire and fire people.

If you want more freedom, you need to DELEGATE the work– not HUSTLE harder.

And have repeatable processes that govern the work that your people are doing.

Want to know my secret weapon and a sneak peek into my focus with next year?

Watch closely what KeapFiverr, and Onlinejobs.ph are doing with us.

I posted two jobs for hiring 3 VA’s and got 285 applications in the last 24 hours.

Want to know the super-effective process for how we quickly and accurately narrowed the list down to just 15 and then down to the final group?

In short, we put a ton of detail in our postings, especially with article links and a codeword for them to use in the subject line of their initial response.

RABBIT is the one for our VA and SQUIRREL is for the designer.

Gmail sorts by threads and by subject lines, so they automatically group responses.
50% get knocked out instantly, but sometimes I’ll make exception (see canned note #1).

Of the initial cut, we look to see if they have personalized their response.
Another 50% of that gets knocked out.

Of the most promising remainder, we look at:
# Did they include a one minute video?
# How good is their English?
# How strong is their portfolio and profile?
# Do they have a cheerful, positive personality?

Maybe means no– so if not HECK YES, then NO, since there are so many amazing ones.

Then we provide one sentence of personalization, not just to show we care, but to ask them follow-up clarification questions. And then we paste in canned note #2, for more content to consume and another video to make.

Of the 5% that pass this filter (which is still 15 people out of 300), we are reasonably certain they would be great employees.

However, we want our internal people to screen them and pick 3-4 of the remainder to hire.

Of course, we don’t have to hire 3-4 people– we could do more or less based on the pool and our needs. Our needs have been growing for this type of support.

But generally, we should be able to get:
# one designer– to help out on guides, infographics, client proposals, skinned documents, personalized dollar bills, website tweaks, video effects, and technical stuff.
# 2 general VAs– to help with basic operational tasks: creating basecamp projects, assembling documents, transcribing videos, editing content, Excel work, and project management.

When we get strong, full-time folks that want to do this as a career, we don’t get the flakiness that we have designed for in the specialist program, since these internal folks must be stable and here for the long-run.

They’re also paid less– most are making $4-6/hour, which is good money, even for a college grad in the Philippines.

We’re basically doubling this, since we want the best– folks who don’t need micro-managing and can cover multiple positions.