Jan Koch and I chat about Dollar a Day and the power of checklists

Jan Koch and I chat about Dollar a Day and the power of checklists

Seven years ago, can you believe it?! I sat down with my buddy Jan Koch, of Virtual Summit Mastery, during the WordPress summit. We chatted about a lot of things, but we spent a lot of time on how to leverage Dollar A Day and the power of checklists.

The transcript is copied below, but if you want to jump into action right away, read this article on how checklists can help you scale your business, and here’s a link to our Dollar A Day program.

Jan Koch: Can you give us a little intro of who you are and what you’re doing currently? 

Dennis Yu: So I’m just a data guy I like to share. And as a geek, hopefully this is good for people who really like to geek out and roll, up their sleeves.

I believe that we can create education for students and this education can be driven an apprenticeship-like model where we teach kids. So we have a 21 year old CEO and you could see that he’s been all over the world. He’s an author – all these different places. And if we lift up these young adults and connect them with their passion and give them jobs and not like a low wage job, but a job that actually ties with the things that they like to do, then they’re going to do the best work for businesses that you would ever see.

We want to create processes and checklists and dashboards and all that,whole structured framework that the education system doesn’t do, but also that the workplace needs. So I think about things that small businesses need. They need a website, they need social media, they need a social app, they need Twitter, then they need all these things.

And so when you unite the supply with this demand, you create an amazing ecosystem. So that’s what we’ve been working on. So we are not an agency, but we, do. Work, but we farm it out to other agencies that are qualified because we’re not an agency. We’re a learning software company. So we produce the dashboard We produce content. We are there to help. We put all of our knowledge out there freely. And today we want to share a lot of that knowledge so that you guys can give it a try. The main thing is something we call Facebook for $1 a Day

Jan Koch: What are the prerequisites? What do we need to have in place being like a small business owner, for example, what do small businesses need to have in place before they can start leveraging Facebook? 

Dennis Yu: So we were talking about how small business owners can generate leads.

A lead is someone filling out a form. It could potentially even be them or watching a video, clicking on something, demonstrating. And in some cases, if you have a low priced product, you can drive a direct sale right there. So we have something that we call this 30 item checklist – and there’s actually more than 30 items – but there’s 30 general items in each of these items break into other items and behind them, there’s videos and articles and other things like that.

But let me just tell you about this briefly because a lot of people, when they see the things at work with some of the brands we work with some big brands and we drive some, pretty good sales numbers. And I think that it’s not possible for small business because they don’t have the time, they don’t have the money, they’re not sophisticated, they don’t have teams of people. 

This 30 item checklist, which you can get now, we’re not selling anything. There’s no hype it’s. This is just try it out, you’ll find out if it works. The prerequisites are these three things set up goals, content, I guess you could say targeted and set up is the things that you would want to have in place anyway. You want to have your tracking pixels, your Google Analytics – probably run that through Google tag manager. You want it, if you have the Facebook conversion tracking, you want the Google conversion tracking, which is both Adwords and through analytics, and you just want to tie everything together.

So we call this the plummet this setup, right. 

Then, goals. What is a lead worth? 

This is usually where these businesses get in trouble. The smaller they are, they are. You run the ads and then I’ll tell you, or run a campaign. And if you’re an agency or a freelancer, you need to know this upfront. If you’re a small business owner, you need to know this upfront. $20, $50 and there’s, a whole math on determining what a lead is worth. And basically it’s following the funnel, and we say, there’s three stages, audience engagement, conversion. If you know what a conversion’s worth, then you can back into what getting an email is worth, right? Because if one to 10 emails buys and a buy in’s worth $50 then an email is worth $5 – that kind of math. 

And if you have your plumbing setup, then you’re able to measure the goals, right? Even if you have your analytics and tracking, and systems and business manager and all that set up, and you can have goals against these goals at different points in the funnel, you have content.

And this is the second, most common reason that businesses fail, especially small ones. They don’t have the content or their content is only conversion content, as opposed to nurturing content along the way, which is necessary to generate the lead and then a lead sequence, a sequence of messages, like an autoresponder, marketing automation that kind of thing, which then leads to an eventual sale.

Often there thought leadership content is so sales oriented that it’s not worth sharing. And when that’s the case, they wonder why their stuff doesn’t convert. So you know, that you can do – on Facebook, you can do crazy targeting, which we’ll go into in just a minute, it works so well, but if you hit the right people, but you don’t have amazing content and we’ll define what amazing is later then it’s going to fail and you can’t blame Facebook.

It’s like buying a brand new Tesla. You don’t know how to drive. You crash into the wall and you blame Tesla. No, it’s because you didn’t know how to drive. And in this case, I think the big failure, on the web I’ve been doing this almost 28 years is crappy content. It’s not because Facebook’s expensive. It’s not because WordPress has bugs or not. No, it’s straight up your content sucks in the same way Tiger woods can beat you and I in golf, even if you and I have the nicest clubs and he has crappy rusted clubs, he’ll beat us. And so people give lip service to this content.

So if you have your goals, content, and targeting together, then you can spend $1 a day and use the techniques that we talked. And that’s a big if, because if you don’t have these 15 items in place, something’s going to go wrong for you. Because if you don’t have the audiences with remarketing setup, which is, remarketing as people who’ve been to your site, and now you want to show them another message on Google or Facebook. 

Remember, this has nothing to do with Facebook or Google or with Twitter or with LinkedIn. It’s just using these guys as a delivery system, in the same way you could say, the people who say, I’ll just say one thing, just so that – because this happens all the time so I just want to get this out of the way. People say, oh this, doesn’t work on social media, cause I’m not very social, or I’m B2B, or I’m some other kind of thing like that, because I think all social media people are doing like sharing silly pictures and things like that, checking in with their friends are doing. 

Well that’s as ridiculous as saying I don’t want to reach my customers, or, my customers, they’re not on WordPress and they’re not on MailChimp. 

The point is that it’s a delivery vehicle. Who cares? It’s not that they’re on Facebook that matters. It’s not that you’re trying to socialize with their drinking pictures of their travel and food pictures. No, what you’re using it as a data platform to connect everything else. 

If they’re on the internet and they’re in a city where there is Facebook or Google, then this applies to them and they can drive leads. And this especially works for small business. Big businesses, they actually are disadvantaged because their ability to personalize is a lot lower.

It’s easier to personalize when you have a narrow niche. So this is really a David and Goliath thing. That’s how I do Facebook. 

Jan Koch: Nice. So how do we get this plumbing in place? What is it that we need to take? 

Dennis Yu: There’s three things you have to do, and you can go through this document and go through all the checklists here.

But let me just tell you what it is, and then everyone here, if you want it, you can go to blitzmetrics.com/all all there’s multiple guides there and go through this, but let me just talk you through conceptually, what’s going on. 

Dennis Yu: Yeah. So the idea of plumbing is, if you have your plumbing in place, then you can run the water through it and it’s not going to leak. So here we say grant us access, but it doesn’t matter. Grant yourself, access, grant, other people that you’re working with access. Maybe you find a really bright student, which is what we’re all about. Train up these bright students, have them do this for you. But either way you need to have your ads account, different kinds of analytics, tag management. Some of these are optional, but if you get these things in place, then when something good happens, you can start to amplify it. 

So let me show you an example of what that might be. Okay. So if you have something that’s high authority that really determines if you are just, it doesn’t matter.

Like I’ll just put on one of these things. Okay. So this is an article I wrote, I’m a journalist here on Ad Week – Ad Week is a big marketing site. And here I wrote a blog post and guess what? It was not on our WordPress. It was on their WordPress. The ultimate SEO is when you post on other people’s site that have more traffic, unless you have so much traffic, and I think this, audience of small businesses, then I think you’re going to get more power posting on other people’s sites.  

Jan Koch: It’s tough to compete with Ad Week, yeah.. 

Dennis Yu: So here’s AdWeek, and I’ve written an article. And look, if you mouse over this do you see, these are all linking to other – these are other things that we have written, right?

And then we talked about goals, content targeting, just like we did, and we’re not doing this from an SEO standpoint. We’re doing it because we want to have content that truly is interesting. In this case here, we’re talking about how do you know if someone’s going to be successful in Facebook ads?

That’s a good question. And we’re targeting this against the agency so that they can use this, these techniques to determine. Are these small businesses going to just be a real headache for you. You could build them an amazing site. You could do a great campaign. You could give them lots of help and be very attentive and teach them and all this.

But these businesses will still fail if you don’t have certain things in place. This is what we’re sharing and then we bring in other experts. So we take this article it’s on AdWeek, and then as you’ve probably seen me do before, I will promote that on Facebook. So if I make a post about it, I could boost that post, but I could just as easily come here and say, I want to send people to this URL that we’re looking at. And then, cause we have all of our plumbing in place. We have all of our tracking, and our conversion,pixels, all we have good content, we know what we stand for. 

Then under here and more demographics, if I’m going too fast for people that haven’t done this before, don’t worry about it. There’s a whole guide around it. Okay. I’m going into work and. So now I’m targeting people who work at the Wall Street Journal. This is not people who read the Wall Street Journal. This is people who work at the Wall Street Journal. 

And if I’ve got an article about whatever kind of vertical about dentists, then I’m going to target the American dentist association. I’m going to talk at the conferences the dentist go to, I’m going to target the media. So who are the influencers? Cause I want to influence the influencers. I think about all the people that, that you would want to hit – is it in the New York times? Not people who read the New York Times, people who work at the New York Times. Think about all the people that are the most influential, that if they were to come out and say, Jan is the best and he’s sharing his information and blah, blah, blah, where would you want your stuff to show up? 

If you had a magic wand and you could have your stuff show up in any publication among any conference organizer, any TV show, like you name it. If I want to be on Fox news food company or all of these guys. So this is your magic wand to influence the media. I’ll just show you one other example. I want to get people thinking broadly into what’s actually possible. I don’t want them thinking social media, whatever, like that’s nonsense. It doesn’t even mean anything. 

So this is one of my random blogs. They have many blogs. This is one I use just to test. So obviously it’s wordpress.com and not org and all this, but whatever, this is just one of them. So I have this, happened just a month ago. I was here in San Francisco and on my way to a meeting at Facebook, and I had a problem with Uber. They, really screwed this thing up. And in fact, they gave it a tag of Uber PR disaster. I waited a week before I wrote this blog post and I tried to resolve it with them, but they really made a mistake because this driver was awful. I ended up having to get another Uber. I missed my train, I took it. And then it was surging three times. It costs me $170. I just made the Facebook meeting in time.a

They said of this problem, of this bad driver, they’re not Uber employees, we’re just an app. They’re just contractors. They’re not employees of ours. And we can’t do anything about this because we already paid the driver. We’re just an app. And this is exactly the problem Uber does not want to have happen, because they’re unregulated and people like, oh yeah, it’s cheaper, but they don’t realize that there’s this there’s a good reason why there’s government regulation in certain areas, right?

So this is the worst thing that can happen to them, by saying something like this. And I said, are you sure? And I gave him multiple. Are you sure you want to, say this, right? Because this is exactly what you should escalate it because I’m going to write an article and I’m going to use you, Marie, as the representative from Uber saying that this is Uber’s position, are you sure?

She confirmed multiple times that she was sure. So then I put this on some nonsense WordPress site that I have. It gets no traffic. I was like most of years out there, no traffic and that’s cause I wanted, I didn’t want to put it on a high-profile site because I wanted to demonstrate that this would work for anybody.

I’m not saying use this just to complain. I use this one complaint when, just as a way to demonstrate how these techniques work, but you can use it to influence anything on anyone. So here it is, I demonstrate what’s going. And the here it is multiple times, she’s saying, no, sorry, Uber’s just an app. So if you have a problem, it’s your fault. If you die, it’s your fault. Explain the whole thing. Very factual. Didn’t get emotional or anything like this. 

And then I took that article and this is the magic of Facebook I went in and I targeted people who work at Uber who worked at Lyft, which is their big competitor. People who work at the taxi commission and there’s like a governing body, their there’s a national taxi limousine commission. I looked at there, the companies that fund them. So all the people in the VC space, I put all of these guys in to get. 

And what do you think happens when their competitor sees blood from a mistake that Uber made? It’s okay that Uber drivers mess up or this happens with any kind of driver, but it’s how you handle it that really becomes the issue. And then you have a Comcast or a United Breaks Guitars kind of issue. This is what you do not want. These companies should be smarter than this, about social media Because when these other guys in the government regulators and their funders and everyone who, they do not want to know about this find out, then it becomes a big deal. And then they’re in a very difficult situation, of their own causing because they continued to escalate it and they, allowed us to document it along the way.

And of course they resolved it. That’s what happened. I tried many times through the regular channels saying guys, I really think you’ve made a mistake. I tried six times and they gave me a $5 credit. You guys really messed up here. Are you really sure? And they kept insisting. Yep. This is your fault. We’re just an app. If you have a problem with the driver, then it’s the driver’s fault. You’ve told me this 6, 7, 8 times. You’ve insisted. And I said, you really should escalate this. Just, my piece of advice to you. 

So if you think about how does this relate to lead gen, if I’m trying to get leads in my – what is your niche, right? What is your area that you’re specializing in. Think about who you need to target, who are those influencers? What are their sites? If you go to Google and you type in the keyword that you want to rank on, who are those other people, right? Who are the folks that have the biggest publications that have, that are best known, that have the highest influence and those people become your friends, and those people become folks that you want to target this way.

Now, if you have an audience already, like an email list then you can go into Facebook and you can start to build audiences of these folks. So remember we said here that there’s a 30 item checklist, and this goes on and on with lots of detail on how do you, click on all these different things and how do you put the pixels in place, all this, but one of these key things here is here in targeting, which is audiences, is you want to upload your email list to match to Facebook, because Facebook will match it about 50%, maybe 60%. And then all the people who are in your email list, you’ll be able to message on Facebook. 

You want to put the pixels in place, which are part of this setup, right? So if you put the custom audience pixel, which is just a Java script, then you have automatically targeted. You’re going to run the Google pixel at the same time you run the Facebook pixel, so that when people visit your site, they’re then going to also be here so that you can send them a message. The effectiveness of email marketing, a lot of people say, oh marketing is great and a lot of people say marketing sucks when people say it sucks is because their email list is too small.

Jan Koch: Or they don’t nurture it the right way, yeah/

Dennis Yu: All the things that apply to email marketing apply here. If you don’t build your list, and nurture it and build it up big. Some people say, oh, I got 20 people on my email list and I want to generate as much sales as the Golden State Warriors in the NBA. No, that’s not possible. Their email list is hundreds of thousands. And then of course it helps if you have a winning sports team and this sort of thing. 

You have to build the list up. So the prerequisite to be able to be really successful in Facebook ads is you have to already have and email list, you have to already have some traffic to your website because Facebook is an amplifier of what’s already working.

So in this case, Jan, I know beyond that for your WordPress summit, you’ve got a fair amount of traffic and then you’re continuing to nurture them. You’re not selling anything. You are acting as like a PR agent where you’re helping, you’re lifting up other people who as being experts in certain areas. And I think everyone here attending this call should know, or watching this video should know who the other people that are really knowledgeable. They’re not competitors of yours. There are people that you want to lift up and when you lift them up and you amplify them, and then you spend a dollar a day on them, you help them spend a dollar a day, then you have something amazing.

So what we’ve done, just for fun, is we’ve done a little coding and we have a WordPress blog generator for all of our students. You can see, there’s a number of them here. They come in and they get a blog. And th this, is a full WordPress blog and they get to be able to they write articles and they talk about stuff and we’ll amplify it. We’ll cross link to one another. You can tell this as a student blog because it’s not written our way. But that’s okay. 

So you see these and they write their blog posts and often they read our content, and they’ll talk about it and you’ll see here, they’re sharing their, stories. Sometimes they just share videos. They prefer to do that sometimes, whatever it is. But if you nurture a group of other people that are producing amazing content, then they’re almost like third party contractors of yours, but they do an amazing, they do amazing things for you. 

If you are PR.

They reciprocate. And I think that’s what a lot of people don’t understand because they think only at one level deep, they think, oh, just my website. I’m going to put all this content on my website. It’s hard enough to do things on my website. Why would I be spending time trying to help other people on their websites? 

Or advertising? Stu Canada – they do software for schools where the schools want to learn how to do. Simulated trading all this. So they have other they, have a network with these schools and professors where they’re teaching certain topics that relate to digital. As these folks are using their software.

This is a great way for us because they have a large list and they have a nice network. We’re happy to come in and teach right? As you should be as everyone here in this video, whatever your expertise is, you want to reach out to these other people and share information. You want to interview them.

Here’s one expert session: What you need to know about the world of Facebook Advertising.  Pretend I didn’t have a list. If I don’t have a list, then I want to share my information with other people who do have a list. Yeah, of course we have the list, but you don’t have a list then this is fantastic because you can come up to other people’s lists. 

So when you create this stuff, it lives on their site, just yes. Blog on these or post here on ad week or it could be business to community or the Wall Street Journal, or we’ve been New York times, LA times NPR, all of these Fox, CBS, we’ve been at all these places, and we get to post and we cross-link. And, when we do this, like here’s another one: When marketers get confused and implementing retargeting. 

We’re talking about the same techniques. Ha what’s the most common problem when people set up retargeting? It’s that they don’t know the difference between the conversion pixel versus the site-wide replay custom audience pixel.

And then we, lift up other people. So this is one of our friend,s Franco, and he runs an agency and we ask him for his feedback and he comes in and gives us his feedback. So we picked him up in this article. 

Jan Koch: Oh, that’s similar to what I’ve done with the guest posts for the WPC. For example, I had a guest post on SEM rush and what I did is I didn’t talk about me, I just shared strategies that some of the speakers in this case, it was all Rand Fishkin. And what was the other one? Oh, that’s embarrassing. But it was two, two speakers who shared their experience on SEO. And I just gave my opinion on those strategies in the guest post. 

Dennis Yu:  Yes, what happens? And then you, say you tweeted them, what are they going to do? They’re going to retweet it. They’re going to mention you, they’re going to link to you now. Now all of a sudden their list is your list. That’s the whole thing that people don’t understand about social media is it’s not a technique to try to cheat the system. Because I think SEO people have this idea that I, if I do this one, one trick, then it’s this in the system I’ll magically unlock the algorithm.

How do you make them look good? Because when you make them look good, they drive traffic to you. And that’s how you build your list into X amount, and then $10,000 a month and all this kind of stuff that you’re talking about. So if you build your business off of other people who have already successfully built their business, then you’re not starting from nothing. 

Most of the small businesses, and we talked to small businesses all the time, but their problem is that they’re trying to multiply off of a base of nothing.

You can have a million times zero is still zero and you’re multiplying off of a base of zero. If you look at Facebook or YouTube or any of these sites that became successful, a lot of people think that it was a lone entrepreneur that was struggling all by themselves. And somehow they worked so hard and then eventually magically they became successful.

But actually what happened with any of these major sites is that they had help from another site. All of them, even Facebook, they were, their money came from gambling. People didn’t want to know that, but casino revenue, right YouTube’s was a porn network. Wikipedia started off as porn. I believe in, and Jimmy Wales is open about that. If you ask or a Google or you’ll find out. 

But every site that we have seen, I’ve been doing this for a long time. Every site that I’ve seen that’s been successful has been successful because they worked with other sites that gave them the traffic.

So retargeting is a way that you’re able to make that happen because you interview them, their list becomes your list, and then you have that. You amplify it again, because if it’s good content, you want to amplify to a similar audience, because then those lists become your list. And a lot of people at that point say, I don’t have time, or I don’t have money.

And we say, okay, you can spend $1 a day. If you target the right audience of just a few hundred people, then $1 a day is super high. 

Jan Koch: Say, for example, if I took the WP summit and I have that landing page where people, when they opt in, they get three free interviews with Dan Norris and Tim Page and Alex Harris. So how would I set up a Facebook campaign for that landing page?

Dennis Yu: Let’s look for the center of influence. You don’t have any singular person so that if we bring in the audience from any one of these people, or we bring in the audience from Forbes or CNN or whatever, it’s not going to immediately stand out. so you lose relevancy. 

So if you had one where you have Matt Mullenweg, who founded WordPress, and there’s an interview with him, and then you target all the people who make WordPress sites that would have very good alignment.

Jan Koch: So it would make sense to have like a landing page for each speaker?

Dennis Yu: Yeah. So you have 28 of these? Because, remember what you’re trying to do is leverage audience to audience. So if you have one of these speakers, then who’s their audience? They’re known in certain areas, they have a different footprint. If you have one with me, for example, then who’s my audience? Where, do I have the most influence? Because that is what you’re going to drive. You’re going to drive that audience to where they’re going to definitely recognize influence. 

The fact that you show something like this 28 world-leading word, WordPress experts. That’s great as a generic kind of catch all. But remember we said that Facebook ads, LinkedIn, Twitter, all the social media platform stuff is based on micro targeted PR. So I can target exactly down to the people in your town that are 35 years old that work at a certain place. Like I can go very, small to tiny audiences and I want to send those people to personalize tuned content for them.

So eventually you’ll have lots and lots of landing pages and eventually you’ll see that landing pages, every article is actually a landing page. So a landing page is just where people come in. 

So we have an article, right? How the golden state warriors got too many clicks on a video drove all these sales. This is before Steph Curry won the MVP. So you can see we’ve got an article and it’s on Ad Week, but we don’t have a form at the end to say, okay, fill in the information and then we’ll send you more. Because this is actually on another site. But what we did. Was we linked to all these other ones that are on our site.

Oh, we linked to one on the Wall Street Journal. We need to wan on whatever. So if they come here, they, so they read through this. If they click, if they like that content and they click through, then they can give us their information. 

So look at this quoted in Forbes today who doesn’t want to be quoted in Forbes and here is why the best SEO firms don’t offer, blah, blah, blah. And it’s our friend, Josh Steimle. So you can you see the orange and the light orange? So yeah, so originally this thing only had, this is a public figure page.

This is not a profile. Okay. A lot of people get confused. Oh, Elizabeth told me I’m not, this is like the last video you ever received me. Cause I don’t like to do video. So here we had organic reach of 2000 and then we boosted it for 6,000 more. A lot of people to like it, but it wasn’t that we got a lot of people to like it, it was that we got a lot of high influence people to like this because we do a lot of work with Infusionsoft and with Marquetto and with Facebook and so forth.

So we, we take our customer audiences and we tie them to these posts and then we send them now what happens if people click through and they go and they click on this, they go to Forbes. They don’t go to our site, they go to Forbes. But then within that Forbes article, we have multiple links that then bring them to our sites.

Because when you see this in your newsfeed, quoted in Forbes, or here’s some interesting article, whatever, and you go to the Wall Street Journal and you read this, you don’t maybe people who are watching this video know that we paid to have that show up, but you’re going to read this and think, wow, this is the Wall Street Journal, and, oh, this is a guy who. Who runs digital for the Golden State Warriors. Here’s what he said. This is an article blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And then you come in and you click on other stuff that we have.

So my, my advice to you on this video whoever’s watching this video is who are the other people that you want to work with that so that you can dominate that space, so you can openly share content openly amplify their expertise, and then you spend a dollar day. You tell each of them to spend a dollar a day. The sum of many people spending a dollar a day drives a lot of traffic and not just a lot of traffic, but a lot of qualified traffic, to the right people that you want, because we’re talking about the best audience that they have. And then your content machine drives you leads.

Jan Koch: So that’s actually interesting for the 10 K a month case study that I’m doing currently, I use WooCommerce to sell productize WordPress services. That will be pretty similar. 

Dennis Yu: For all the people who were 20 minutes in and are actually watching this, I’ll tell you my one big secret: checklists.

So the content that we have on. We were talking about certain things, talking to you, like you have your five SEO tips or here’s other ones. Oh, here’s 10 tips on how to do stuff. Guess what? Those are all checklists. All of our articles with exception of a few are really just promoting our checklists.

Was it a good article? A good how to article is, oh, here’s the seven things you need to do. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, just like this 30 item checklist. This is a checklist, right? It’s a sequence of actions and when you prove that the sequence of actions works through an article like this one, How the Golden State Warriors did this and this 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 is how they did it.

And everyone has their 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. So when you have articles that say. I’m Jan and, or I interviewed somebody and here’s what they have. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, here, there, here’s the order of the things you need to do and their checklist. Then they’re going to naturally want to get the checklist.

Where do they get the checklist? You have to fill out the form to get the checklist. 

Jan Koch: Actually that really ties in well with what Tim Page shared on the WP summit, which is a leadpages test tested, countless different opt-ins. And they even gave away a one hour chat with Clay Collins with SEO, but the checklist outperformed even that one hour, by far.

Dennis Yu: Yeah. So I’ll give you an example. So today we’re talking about a checklist for Facebook for a dollar a day, right? I’m sure people, they want this checklist. So where do you go? Let’s blitzmetrics.com/fdd, which is Facebook for a dollar a day. So come in and get this checklist on how to do this kind of stuff.

And then if you want the personal brand and guide PBG, same thing. So all the techniques on how do you develop your content and how do you interview other people? How do you write your stuff? Even if you don’t know how to interview people, here’s how you write how you do a, video interview and come and turn it into a podcast and turn the podcast into an article and distributed.

And our backend content marketing team. How do we do this? We promote right? Cause once this video is live we’re going to then promote it. 

So it’s checklists. So for us, it’s checklist, we’re even showing you, we write articles. I just showed you. We have articles all over the place. Those articles are there to actually educate. 

The thing I hate the most about the internet marketing people is that they say, oh, he did if you just sign up for our thing, we’ll tell you like the 10 secrets, but they never actually tell you anything. They just go on and on for an hour about how all this amazing But they never tell you a single, actual technique.

Share your techniques, openly, share your techniques like in these articles and we have all these kids coming in, they’re sharing the techniques. We’re sharing real statistics right here. It is videos. We’re sharing it. We’re not because we’re not trying to promote then $39 and we’re not doing it right We’re just giving it out. Go try it. 

And then the checklists, when people download a checklist, that is actually your lead. And that’s the thing that people don’t understand about lead gen. Because if you, I don’t even the word landing page assumes that, the fish are coming into a net. And if you’re a fish, you recognize what a net looks like and you don’t want to be in there.

That’s like a telemarketer or religious people that come knock on your door. So rather than say lead gen or conversion or stuff like. Talk about personal branding and thought leadership. Because if you put your expertise out there and say, okay, I worked very hard. I put this whole thing together for you. Look, I put this whole thing together for you, all this. All of this stuff. I put it out right here for you. Come get it. I give this to you. Put your name and email. I will give this to you. And so, now my focus – this is still a landing page, but psychologically, it’s I’m giving you a gift. I am sharing. So the fish comes in and says, oh this, is not a hook. This is food, right? This is good food. This is safe. I’m not going to get killed if I do this thing here, because the focus is on delivering the content, right?

So when we do this, then the lead gen is amazing, right? Because people come in, they fill this out, they read through our guides. Some people are successful. Most people are confused. Most people that go through all this and say, oh, this is really good, but man, there’s so many things here and now I want I just want to hire someone.

Can you do this for me? Because I know you guys do this all, here’s a checklist and you have enough items in the checklist. It’s Aw crap. Yeah, I know these are all good, but I just, I don’t have time for the checklist and then they can hire you. 

Jan Koch: And th that’s how you nurture the lead basically, and turn it into a customer.

Dennis Yu: And that’s the secret there to lead gen. It’s you create content that looks so good, that is authoritative, that is first party experience that drives people into a checklist, the checklist they download, and then your sequence begins with email. You have five messages in a role like three days apart whatever it is and you actually use, done properly, your nurture sequence is there to actually disqualify people. It’s not to try to get as many people to convert as possible, because there are some clients that are just terrible. You don’t want to touch them no matter what. 

If you’re an agency or you’re a freelancer and you’re listing, then you should know that you should fire and most of your clients, just a couple ones that are really good and the other ones should get rid of. Cause they’re just taking up all your time and double up and triple up in the really good clients. I promise you, that’s the case. There’s always one or two clients that treat you well And the other one wastes your time. 

Jan Koch: Actually, Mike Report has a really good book about this. It is a book yourself solid, and he explains the red velvet rope policy, which just talks about how to find the right clients to work with and which clients just to lay off. 

Dennis Yu: And we call those people free tarts.

You spent a lot of time talking to people that oh, I spend an hour on the phone, just you’re giving like free consulting over and over again. But if you have good content out here, then you never have to have any free consulting calls because anyone who comes to you then becomes inbound.

And if they’re not sure that they’re not sure, like what’s what service you offer. Guess what you take your checklist and you turn it into a. And so in this case here, our Facebook implementation we’ve turned into a package. That’s $3,000. We don’t discount it. We’re raising the price of $10,000.

And even if people have the money, we don’t take their money because they have to qualify. They have to have a list. They have to have goals. They have to have content goals, content target. And there’s a whole video.

And so we put our content. We put the checklists out there. If they want to buy, they can buy. But even if they want to buy, we don’t want to take their money because some clients are just not worth the headache. So on and on. And then you can see that w the way people come here is that they, they see our content, they see the checklist.

So I think this is something everybody can do. Everybody can produce content and checklist and turn the checklist and the packages they sell 

Jan Koch: We are already very close to the 30 minute mark for this interview, if not we’re exceeded at already. I would love to sum it up and I don’t want to take up too much of your time because I know how busy you are.

Basically the process looks are you, have all the analytics in place, all the tracking metrics in place on your website, you create amazing content that uplifts someone else so that you can leverage their audience on Facebook, basically you can promote that content. And then throughout the content, you have places where people can opt-in to your list or have a call with you or whatever they need to do to get in touch with you, basically end to qualify as a lead for you.

Dennis Yu: Exactly. And you use Facebook ads for a dollar a day to really influence that funnel. 

Jan Koch: Great stuff. Is it for Facebook ads? Just to clarify the smaller the audience or the more targeted the audience, the better, right?

Dennis Yu: Yeah, because if you’re only spending a dollar, you’re talking about audiences that are a few hundred. Any bigger than that, and it’s not going to be effective as you’re trying to target an audience that’s 50,000 or a 100,000, I would question whether you’re really targeting as far as need. If you’re targeting mass consumers, you’re not targeting the influencers. 

Jan Koch: Great stuff. One last question. How do I set up an ad campaign that basically leads to a sales page for a $20 eBook or something?

Dennis Yu: So you have three parts of the funnel: audience, engagement, and conversion, and you need to put money against each section. And I would say put a few dollars against each of these. So, of course you’re trying to drive some kind of sale, but you can’t put out all the money only against the conversion part of the bucket.

If you put some money to amplify posts that are just general awareness, like here’s one where we’re talking about goals, content, targeting, and you should actually use this, this is the same thing that we do here. This is to establish authority. We’re not collecting leads. This is actually informational. This is audience building. So you spend a dollar a day on each post that you think is worthy of this. Then you spend a dollar a day on each post that drives people to your site, to get them to fill out a form. And then you spend a dollar a day on retargeting. 

Retargeting is when they’ve come to your site, and now you’re trying to get them to come back where they didn’t buy. And that’s what closes the deal. 

So it should take three to five. Because you have audience, engagement, conversion, and we call this the AEC funnel. You have to put a little effort at each stage in this funnel. Make one post in each of these buckets and put a dollar a day against each other, but now you’re spending $3 a day. And then you can track how many people go from your general awareness kind of articles to your site, because you can look inside your Google analytics. And then you can see in your Google analytics, how many people fill out the form and then have the people fill out the form, how many people bought your package? 

So you can actually see the effectiveness of every piece of content that you have because you have your plumbing in place with your custom audiences and your Google analytics and your conversion tracking and your Google tag manager and your Google website optimizer and all of those types of data.

Jan Koch: Great stuff. Really. I’m just thinking about all the links that I have to put in place below the video.

Great stuff. I really appreciate that. You’re so open about your strategies. 

Dennis Yu: Thanks, Jan. And I’ll leave everybody with one last thing. As you practice these things, you may find that you’re confused, or you may find that you want to do some kind of perfect thing. Don’t let perfection stop you. Take small steps. 

Here’s one way to make sure you’re successful document what you do. Take a screenshot as you do it, write an article and literally your articles should, take five minutes. Cause the biggest problem in small business, they don’t create content. They get stuck. They’re too busy. They’re whatever, but literally spent five minutes to produce that piece of content.

And if you’ve documented it and done a good job, you could even give it to me. And I will share it across my network. I might even feature you on one of the sites that we do this on. So if you want to email me, it’s just Dennis@blitzmetrics.com. And if you’ve got a screenshot step-by-step example where you demonstrate how you’re following any of the techniques that we talk about, that we will elevate you.

I got 40,000 followers to prove it.

Jan Koch: great stuff. Actually, I was just going to ask you how people can get in touch with you. So that’s dennis@blitzmetrics.com anywhere else you want people, or you want to point people to, after watching this. 

Dennis Yu: Sure that he’d go to meet me on LinkedIn or on Twitter. I can’t take any more friend requests on Facebook because the limit is 5,000, but I’m old-fashioned.

And if you’re a business person, then email is how you generate business and how you communicate. So Dennis blitz metrics.com is the best way, or you can just Google me. You can see I’m very, I’m pretty easily.

I’ve been spending $2 a day boosting posts on Facebook.

How do you think it performed?

Some people might say that $135 to generate just one click was a big waste of money.

Others might note that I reached 14,000 people works out to a $9 CPM– $9 to reach 1,000 people, which is about average on Facebook, boosted post or not.

And still some will say that the 10,700 interactions works out to just over a penny per engagement– potentially good.

The real answer is that you don’t really know until you can map it all the down to the business result– the call, store visit, or sale.

Use diagnostic metrics to troubleshoot why you did or didn’t hit the business metric.

But START with the business metric first, then tree down to secondary diagnostic metrics– not the other way around, like most people do.

600 likes for one dollar

The $1 a day strategy works stronger than ever.

The harder the algorithm is penalizing losers, the harder it’s rewarding winners at the same time.

So increasingly, you’ll see two camps emerge…

1) People who see ads costs go, complain, and get forced out of the game.

2) People who see massive engagement that leads to multi-touch, profitable conversions across multiple channels.

Short-form video is the key ingredient, so get super cheap mid-funnel engagement. I still see clients in many verticals (not just media, sports, and entertainment) get $2 CPMs on boosted posts, while some folks who run conversion ads on cold traffic are at $60+ per thousand impressions.

Next, we need analytics to trace those touches all the way through to the conversions that then occur via Google, email, in-store, word of mouth, and so forth.

99% of Facebook advertisers don’t know that all reporting is last click– meaning that assists get zero credit.

You have to choose attribution models within Google Analytics and Facebook to see how channels are working together.

Even the more sophisticated buyers think that choosing between 1/7/28 day view/click is attribution– not realizing that this is merely choosing the data input, which is NOT the attribution method (how to award conversion credit).

So even with killer video, without smart attribution (analytics), they will declare failure on the very ads that are actually driving sales, while putting more burden on the last touch ads.

The effect is a downward spiral that results in more pressure on cold audiences to convert– causing positive/negative engagement to go out of whack, CPMs to shoot up, and then complaints.

These same people like to say that “boosting doesn’t work”– because their measurement is wrong and they’re trying to instantly convert on every touch.

Some have realized that when you run reports a couple weeks after a campaign, that attributed conversions go up or that by uploading offline conversions, they were missing out on tracking conversions that got hidden by the Apple cookie issue.

In 2020, you’ll have to decide which of the two above camps you want to be in.

The dollar a day strategy works on Twitter, too, you know.

This pinned tweet got half a million impressions, 80% of which were paid.

Of the 50,000 interactions, 98% were from paid, but only an admin would be able to spot this.

Whatever works on Facebook, replicate to Twitter with the same content and targeting combos.

Boost for a dollar a day, except you must be extra careful on tightening audiences down, since the Twitter algo isn’t as smart. It will waste your money on giant audiences at high auto bids if you let it. I manually bid to 2 cents per engagement or a penny a video view.

I don’t see anyone doing this except for Nick Venezia, who is the smartest advertiser in Twitter I know.

Here are the stats on a LinkedIn post I made a while ago.

If you’re going after engagement, you might be disappointed in getting only 10 likes.

But if your goal is impact, which it should be, notice the 522 views, which is probably about 430 in reach.

Most people, including you and me, don’t publicly comment on posts.

But many people come up to me at events, telling me about how much they appreciate what they have learned over the years.

Many subscribers of BlitzNation, our monthly membership, were lurkers who never engaged publicly for many reasons. Yet they are stronger fans than those who merely click like.

I believe the Facebook algorithm can distinguish between people who merely click like on everything versus who truly might buy what you and I have to sell.

So stop going for artificial, misleading metrics, and instead drive for influence and conversion via the 3 part #ACC funnel and powerful algorithm that Facebook makes available to us.

In other words, sequence your messages from awareness to consideration to conversion.

That one post of yours on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter might get only 10 likes, but influence a few people that eventually become some of your biggest customers.

The Scrappy Entrepreneur’s Video Studio for under $1,000

I’m a busy entrepreneur who doesn’t want to mess with expensive, complex video equipment. I’m here to make money for our company and our clients, not make the next Star Wars trilogy.

Over the last 5 years, I’ve tried dozens of cameras, lights, and gadgets at various price ranges. And as you can probably guess, fancy equipment at the hands of a novice does worse than a pro with just an iPhone. I don’t want to check 5 cases of equipment each time I go to the airport either. And I can’t tell the difference between an $85,000 Red camera and a simple DSLR, especially when watching video on a cell phone.

Or maybe I’m just old with poor eyesight– perhaps I don’t have the eye of the pro. But you probably don’t, either. And I’ll bet you want to know what equipment and techniques are actually necessary to drive sales via video.

So after wasting hundreds of hours watching YouTube videos, talking to people who are successfully using video to sell things online, I’ve prepared this list of equipment for you to buy.  I hope this saves you a ton of trial and error– I know it has for my non-video, non-technical friends that have bought these items and have quickly started to produce solid videos to drive sales for their company.

You’re busy, on a budget, and don’t have time to fool around– get these items that are under $1,000 in total:

Studio Setup

Video

Sony Alpha A7 R II – Price: $1,079.95

Neewer Professional Aluminum Alloy Tripod – $109.94

Neewer Professional Aluminum Alloy Tripod

Lighting

Fovitec StudioPRO LED Panel Bundle – $329.99

Fovitec StudioPRO LED Panel Bundle

Fovitec Softbox Kit – $189.95

Fovitec Softbox Lighting Kit

Neewer 14″ Ring Light Kit – $89.99

Neewer 14″ Ring Light Kit

I love this ring light kit. It includes everything you need to get up and running (ring light, stand, charger, carrying case, phone adapter, etc.).

Audio

Saramonic Dual Wireless VHF Lavalier Microphone Bundle – $234.95

Saramonic Dual Wireless VHF Lavalier Microphone Bundle

Sennheiser ClipMic Digital Mobile Recording Microphone for iOS Devices – $199.95

Sennheiser ClipMic Digital Mobile Recording Microphone for iOS Devices.png

RODE VideoMic Studio Boom Kit – VM, Boom Stand, Adapter, 25′ Cable – $169.00

RODE VideoMic Studio Boom Kit – VM, Boom Stand, Adapter, 25′ Cable

Blue Yeti USB Microphone – $129.00

Blue Yeti USB Microphone

The Blue Yeti USB microphone is one of the best USB microphones you will find. This mic is great for webinars, podcasts, and interviews you do online. The Blue Yeti has a headphone output, so you can hear your interview and talk without much latency – a great feature for a USB mic.

2 Lavalier Lapel Microphones Set for Dual Interview – $45.35

2 Lavalier Lapel Microphones Set for Dual Interview

Miscellaneous Extras

DJI Mavic Pro Fly More Combo Collapsible Quadcopter Drone Safety Bundle – $1,299.00

DJI Mavic Pro Fly More Combo Collapsible Quadcopter Drone Safety Bundle

Glide Gear Teleprompter (iPad Size) – $199.99

Glide Gear Teleprompter (iPad Size)

Having a teleprompter for live streams, courses and other videos can help ensure you don’t skip a beat when it comes to your content.

Smartphone Teleprompter – $134.95

Smartphone Teleprompter

A smaller teleprompter that utilizes your smartphone to display your video copy.

DGI Osmo Mobile 2 Handheld Smartphone Gimbal – $118.95

DGI Osmo Mobile 2 Handheld Smartphone Gimbal

The DGI Osmo Mobile 2 is great for recording smooth video with your smartphone. Easily rotate, pan and tilt the camera with the attached joystick.

DTSE batteries and charger for box lights – $35.99

DTSE batteries and charger for box lights

SanDisk 128GB Memory Card – $26.89

SanDisk Ultra 128GB Memory Card

Green Screen Backdrop – $32.94

Green Screen Backdrop

LimoStudio Photo/Video Backdrop Stand – $34.99

LimoStudio Video Backdrop Stand

Anker 6 Port USB Wall Charger – $25.99

Anker 6 Port USB Wall Charger

Coty Airspun Face Powder – $5.67

Coty Airspun Face Powder

Grand Total: $2,578.02 (Not including Misc. Items)

Beginner Bundle

Video

Pretty much any smartphone will do here, just make sure you are capturing video with the camera stabilized on a tripod.

Lighting

NEEWER Dimmable Video Light – $23.99

NEEWER Dimmable Video Light

QIAYA Selfie Light Ring for Cell Phones – $14.99

QIAYA Selfie Light Ring for Cell Phones

A portable ring light that is great for recording video on the go.

 

Before using the Light Ring

After using the Light Ring

Audio

Rode smartLav+ Lavalier Microphone for iPhone and Smartphones – Price: $58.19

Rode smartLav+ Lavalier Microphone for iPhone and Smartphones

Rode SC1 20′ TRRS Extension Cable For SmartLav+ – $27.60

Rode SC1 20′ TRRS Extension Cable For SmartLav+

I’ve found that what’s more important than the quality of your equipment is whether you actually use it or not. Set up a dedicated space, ideally a whole room, so you can record whenever you feel like it.  If you have to set things up and put them away, you’ll be less motivated to make your one-minute videos or even a string of them.

When you are out and about, you need only your iPhone, mobile ring light, and Lavalier microphone. I like the two Lav mic set from PowerDeWise because it’s cheap and plugs directly into the lightning bolt jack in modern iPhones.  You could buy a headphone jack to lightning bolt adapter to switch between plugs or even use regular headphones.

If you’re new to speaking in front of a video camera and are a bit shy (we’ve all been there), here are two techniques to help you shine.

1) Have your friend or colleague interview you, so you’re looking at them, while the camera is off to the side. Staring into that empty void is intimidating– and I think it’s harder than speaking on stage since the camera doesn’t provide any feedback.  It just stares back at you.

2) Buy a Parrot or tablet-mounted teleprompter.  The Parrot teleprompter screws onto your DSLR camera– super easy and super cheap.  The larger teleprompter lets you see more words, so if the camera is more than 6 feet away, get the bigger one.  There are mobile apps that are teleprompters, but I find the quality awful.

Here are some tips for filming whiteboard sessions.