The mindset of an employee versus a profit maximizer

One of our team members asked if they should increase the budget on a campaign from $80/day to $140 a day.
Here’s what I said.

Please choose whatever budget you see fit in your expert opinion.
You’re the pro!

You know our business goals and are best positioned to determine what tweaks to make to maximize revenue at the target ROAS.

Since we know in eCommerce, unlike most agency work, it’s not about a daily budget (which is about managing expenses), but about maximizing profit (at whatever spend maximizes this).

A typical agency employee has the goal to spend exactly $X as the budget– which can be too low if the campaigns are profitable, but too high if we’re wasting money.

So use your pro skills to test and optimize, while we’re here to advise in our areas (me on strategy/optimization), the client on content/financials, Daniel on analytics, etc…

Want to know how to spot in 15 seconds whether an analysis is worth reading?

Want to know how to spot in 15 seconds whether an analysis is worth reading?

Here’s an actual attempt at analysis that an internal team member submitted on the performance of a client. Look it over for second and see if you can tell what company it’s for.

If you can’t, then it means they’re robotically going through the numbers– reading numbers off a chart, instead of understanding WHY a key business metric went up or down and WHAT we need to do about it.

So here’s the tip– look for rich GCT (goals, content, targeting) in what you or a team member submits. If they don’t intimately understand the heart of your company, then they’re just mindlessly cranking out charts– something a simple computer program could do in converting stats to sentences.

Are you or your team members guilty of this– to pretend to be doing analysis, when you’re just regurgitating numbers from a report? Look for GCT as the telltale sign.

>>>>SAVE THIS<<<<<

Most of you don’t have Search Console activated in your Google Analytics.

As a result, you can’t see what people are searching for even if they don’t come to your website.

For example, look at Search Console query data, where we see that way more people are searching for “3×3 video grid” than anything else where we show up in search.

But if we sort by clicks, “blitzmetrics” and “dennis yu” drive the most traffic, since it’s a higher intent search (brand terms) and higher average position.

We can also look at the top content for our site (under “landing pages”, letting us know what we should write more about, what content to tweak (for higher position), and what isn’t working.

Let me know if you want our training on how to set up Search Console or have us do it for you.

I am NOT a Facebook marketer

I am an expert at driving sales and I happen to use Facebook.

I am NOT an analytics geek– I am relentless in creating the systems that generate jobs for young adults.

I am NOT a book lover– though I’ve read over 4,500 books, I’m hungry for the knowledge I need to achieve my goals, which compels me to read.

Nike is not a shoe manufacturer– but about “authentic athletic performance” and teaching “everyone is an athlete”. And they happen to make shoes.

FedEx is not a package delivery company– they are about “peace of mind” and “the world on time”, though they have the largest fleet of cargo aircraft on the planet.

WHO you are is not your activity– it’s your MISSION, not the TOOLS you use to accomplish it.

I want to know WHO you are and how I can help you achieve your vision.

Always Be Testing!

I thought this post was going to do well, since it had a couple photogenic people in an interview at a conference.

Even though the engagement rate was close to 10% (17 out of 219), I got hammered by the Facebook algo, charging me $6 to reach 200 people.

That a $30 CPM (cost per 1,000 impressions), which leads to 40 cents per like.

If we were trying to drive sales here, then this wouldn’t necessarily be bad.

But for top of funnel awareness/engagement
on this public figure page, I had to kill this boosted post.

90% of my boosted posts fail. And the 10% that win are not the ones I would have predicted.

Trust the data— always be testing!

Want to know how to spot in 15 seconds whether an analysis is worth reading?

Here’s an actual attempt at analysis that an internal team member submitted on the performance of a client. Look it over for second and see if you can tell what company it’s for.

If you can’t, then it means they’re robotically going through the numbers– reading numbers off a chart, instead of understanding WHY a key business metric went up or down and WHAT we need to do about it.

So here’s the tip– look for rich GCT (goals, content, targeting) in what you or a team member submits. If they don’t intimately understand the heart of your company, then they’re just mindlessly cranking out charts– something a simple computer program could do in converting stats to sentences.

Are you or your team members guilty of this– to pretend to be doing analysis, when you’re just regurgitating numbers from a report? Look for GCT as the telltale sign.